Wassail

There’s your average house-wassailling, where groups move from house to house singing songs, and there’s your tree-wassailing, where groups move from orchard to orchard to scare the evil spirits out and encourage a fruitful new year.  In the first kind of wassailing, wassailers would be rewarded by the homeowner with a warm, spiced beverage called wassail (original, right?).

To celebrate Yule this year, I made a fantastic batch of wassail and it was enjoyed by all.  It’s warm and spiced, and the bottle of red wine you put in doesn’t hurt things, either.  All jokes aside, wassail is simple to make and festive to boot.  It almost makes me think I wouldn’t mind singing from door to door in the cold weather if I knew someone would hand me a mug full of the stuff as a reward for my efforts.  This is a simple wassail, it doesn’t involve raw eggs or tea bags or anything complicated.  There are so many versions of wassail (go ahead, google it, I’ll wait), but this is my favorite.  One of my favorite things about it is you can heat it in the crock pot, and when you’ve got green beans, potatoes, rolls and a prime rib roast in the oven, that’s a beautiful thing.

Wassail

Ingredients:

  • 4 C. apple cider
  • 4 C. cranberry juice (I like both plain cranberry juice, and cranberry-pomegranate blend)
  • 1 bottle (750 ml) sweet red wine
  • 2 Tbs. ground cinnamon
  • 1 Tbs. ground nutmeg
  • 1 tsp. ground clove

Directions:

Combine all ingredients in a crock pot (you can double or halve ingredients depending on the size of your crock pot or number of wassailers being served).

If using a crock pot, set to low and heat on low for 4 hours.  Stir about every 2 hours to blend in the spices completely.

Serve warm.

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Wassail

  1. ALM TREE, I used “Jam Jar Sweet Shiraz” for this, and it turned out wonderfully. It retails for around 10$ a bottle here. “Barefoot Sweet Red Wine” is also a good choice, and even more of a bargain at around 7$. I stick by the standard rule- if I wouldn’t drink it on its own, I don’t use it in a recipe, and both of these are a sweet, drinkable red wine well suited to wassail.
    Keep in mind, sweet is typically considered a flaw in a good red wine, so you’ll find that most sweet reds are described as “fruity.”

    Like

  2. Hrm, I may try this instead of the mulled wine recipe I had. Is this a SUPER sweet drink or is it kinda toned down once it’s cooked? Maybe I can try a wine that’s semi-sweet to tone it down a bit? What do you think?

    Thanks for sharing the recipe!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s